Updated on 2023/05/17

写真a

 
TAKADA Mayura
 
Organization
Faculty of Science and Engineering Professor
Other responsible organization
Civil, Human and Environmental Science and Engineering Course of Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Master's Program
Civil, Human and Environmental Science and Engineering Course of Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doctoral Program
External link

Degree

  • 博士(農学) ( 東京大学 )

  • 修士(農学) ( 東京大学 )

Education

  • 2004.7
     

    The University of Tokyo   doctor course   finished without a degree after completion of required course credits

  • 2001.3
     

    The University of Tokyo   master course   completed

  • 1999.3
     

    Tsuda College   graduated

Research History

  • 2022.4 - Now

    Chuo University   理工学部人間総合理工学科   教授

  • 2020.4 - 2022.3

    Chuo University   Faculty of Science and Engineering Department of Integrated Science and Engineering for Sustainable Society Bachelor of Engineering   Associate Professor

  • 2013.12 - 2020.3

    東京大学大学院   農学生命科学研究科   准教授

  • 2009.4 - 2013.11

    Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine   Department of Life Science and Agriculture   Assistant Professor

  • 2008.4 - 2009.3

    東京大学大学院   農学生命科学研究科   特任助教

  • 2007.4 - 2008.3

    東京大学大学院   農学生命科学研究科   研究拠点形成特任研究員

  • 2004.8 - 2007.3

    東京大学大学院   農学生命科学研究科   学術研究支援員

  • 2003.4 - 2004.7

    東京大学大学院   農学生命科学研究科   学術振興会特別研究員・DC2

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Professional Memberships

  • 2009.1 - Now

    ARACHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF JAPAN

  • 2004.1 - Now

    JAPANESE SOCIETY OF APPLIED ENTOMOLOGY AND ZOOLOGY

  • 2000.7 - Now

    THE MAMMAL SOCIETY OF JAPAN

  • 2000.1 - Now

    THE ECOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF JAPAN

Research Interests

  • 群集生態学

  • 個体群生態学

  • 大型哺乳類

  • クモ

  • 森林生態系

  • 水田生態系

  • 斑点米カメムシ

Research Areas

  • Environmental Science/Agriculture Science / Plant protection science  / Plant protection science

  • Environmental Science/Agriculture Science / Plant protection science

  • Environmental Science/Agriculture Science / Landscape science  / Environmental agriculture(including landscape science)

  • Environmental Science/Agriculture Science / Environmental agriculture  / Environmental agriculture(including landscape science)

  • Life Science / Forest science  / Forest science

  • Environmental Science/Agriculture Science / Environmental dynamic analysis  / Environmental dynamic analysis

  • Life Science / Ecology and environment  / Ecology/Environment

  • Environmental Science/Agriculture Science / Conservation of biological resources  / Conservation of biological resources

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Papers

  • Periodically taken photographs reveal the effect of pollinator insects on seed set in lotus flowers. Reviewed International journal

    Nagai, M, Y Higuchi, Y Ishikawa, W Guo, T Fukatsu, Y G Baba, M B Takada

    Scientific Reports   12   11051   2022.7

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    Authorship:Corresponding author   Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Springer Science and Business Media LLC  

    DOI: 10.1038/s41598-022-15090-0

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  • Estimating plant–insect interactions under climate change with limited data Reviewed

    Yui Tamura, Takeshi Osawa, Ken Tabuchi, Kazuhisa Yamasaki, Tokumitsu Niiyama, Shigeto Sudo, Yasushi Ishigooka, Akira Yoshioka, Mayura B. Takada

    Scientific Reports   12 ( 1 )   2022.7

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    Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Springer Science and Business Media LLC  

    Abstract

    Climate change may disrupt species–species interactions via phenological changes in one or both species. To predict and evaluate the influence of climate change on these interactions, long-term monitoring and sampling over large spatial areas are required; however, funding and labor constraints limit data collection. In this study, we predict and evaluate the plant–insect interactions with limited data sets. We examined plant–insect interaction using observational data for development of the crop plant rice (Oryza sativa) and an effective accumulated temperature (EAT) model of two mirid bugs (Stenotus rubrovittatus and Trigonotylus caelestialium). We combined 11 years of records monitoring rice phenology and the predicted phenology of mirid bugs using spatially–explicit EAT models based on both spatially and temporally high resolutions temperature data sets, then evaluated their accuracy using actual pest damage records. Our results showed that the predicted interactions between rice and mirid bugs explained rice damage to some degree. Our approach may apply predicting changes to plant–insect interactions under climate change. As such, combining plant monitoring records and theoretical predictions of insect phenology may be effective for predicting species–species interactions when available data are limited.

    DOI: 10.1038/s41598-022-14625-9

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    Other Link: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-022-14625-9

  • Intraspecific variations in life history traits of two pecky rice bug species from Japan: Mapping emergence dates and number of annual generations Reviewed

    Kazuhisa Yamasaki, Ken Tabuchi, Akihiko Takahashi, Takeshi Osawa, Akira Yoshioka, Yasushi Ishigooka, Shigeto Sudo, Mayura B. Takada

    ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION   11 ( 23 )   16936 - 16950   2021.11

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    Authorship:Corresponding author   Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:WILEY  

    The mirid bugs Stenotus rubrovittatus and Trigonotylus caelestialium, which cause pecky rice, have become a threat to rice cultivation in Asia. Damage caused by these pests has rapidly become frequent since around 2000 in Japan. Their expansion pattern is not simple, and predicting their future spread remains challenging. Some insects with wide ranges have locally adapted variations in life-history traits. We performed laboratory rearing experiments to assess the geographical scale of intraspecific variations in life-history traits of S. rubrovittatus and T. caelestialium. The experiments were aimed at increasing the accuracy of occurrence estimates and the number of generations per year. These results were compared with previous research, and differences in development rates were observed between populations of different latitudes, but not of the same latitude. Finally, plotting the timing of adult emergence and the potential number of generations per year on maps with a 5-km grid revealed that they differed greatly locally at the same latitude. These maps can be used for developing more efficient methods of managing mirid bugs in integrated pest management.

    DOI: 10.1002/ece3.8329

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  • Occurrence patterns of crop-foraging sika deer distribution in an agriculture-forest landscape revealed by nitrogen stable isotopes Reviewed

    Ayaka Hata, Rumiko Nakashita, Keita Fukasawa, Masato Minami, Yuko Fukue, Naoko Higuchi, Hikaru Uno, Yasuhiro Nakajima, Midori Saeki, Chinatsu Kozakai, Mayura Takada

    ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION   11 ( 21 )   15303 - 15311   2021.11

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    Conflicts arising from the consumption of anthropogenic foods by wildlife are increasing worldwide. Conventional tools for evaluating the spatial distribution pattern of large terrestrial mammals that consume anthropogenic foods have various limitations, despite their importance in management to mitigate conflicts. In this study, we examined the spatial distribution pattern of crop-foraging sika deer by performing nitrogen stable isotope analyses of bone collagen. We evaluated whether crop-foraging deer lived closer to agricultural crop fields during the winter and spring, when crop production decreases. We found that female deer in proximity to agricultural crop fields during the winter and spring were more likely to be crop-foraging individuals. Furthermore, the likelihood of crop consumption by females decreased by half as the distance to agricultural crop fields increased to 5-10 km. We did not detect a significant trend in the spatial distribution of crop-foraging male deer. The findings of spatial distribution patterns of crop-foraging female deer will be useful for the establishment of management areas, such as zonation, for efficient removal of them.

    DOI: 10.1002/ece3.8216

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  • Agricultural crop consumption induces precocious maturity in deer by improving physical and reproductive performance Reviewed

    Ayaka Hata, Rumiko Nakashita, Tomoko Anezaki, Masato Minami, Yuko Fukue, Naoko Higuchi, Hikaru Uno, Yasuhiro Nakajima, Midori Saeki, Chinatsu Kosakai, Mayura B. Takada

    Ecosphere   12 ( 4 )   e0346   2021.4

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Wiley  

    DOI: 10.1002/ecs2.3464

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    Other Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full-xml/10.1002/ecs2.3464

  • Hair growth of brown bears during winter

    Miku Tajima, Ayaka Hata, Rumiko Nakashita, Kazuyoshi Sasaki, Naoya Matsumoto, Jumpei Tomiyasu, Mayura B. Takada, Tatsuo Oshida

    Research Bulletin of Obihiro University   41   61 - 65   2020.11

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (bulletin of university, research institution)   Publisher:National University Corporation Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine  

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  • Utilization of municipality records for the early-stage management of introduced raccoons in Japan Reviewed International journal

    Emi Yamaguchi, Mutsuyo Kadohira, Kei Fujii, Kohei Kobayashi, Mayura Takada

    Management of Biological Invasions   11 ( 2 )   306 - 324   2020

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    Authorship:Last author   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Regional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centre Oy (REABIC)  

    DOI: 10.3391/mbi.2020.11.2.09

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  • A global synthesis reveals biodiversity-mediated benefits for crop production Reviewed

    Matteo Dainese, Emily A Martin, Marcelo Aizen, Matthias Albrecht, Ignasi Bartomeus, Riccardo Bommarco, Luisa G Carvalheiro, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Vesna Gagic, Lucas A Garibaldi, Jaboury Ghazoul, Heather Grab, Mattias Jonsson, Daniel S Karp, Christina M Kennedy, David Kleijn, Claire Kremen, Douglas A Landis, Deborah K Letourneau, Lorenzo Marini, Katja Poveda, Romina Rader, Henrik G Smith, Teja Tscharntke, Georg KS Andersson, Isabelle Badenhausser, Svenja Baensch, Antonio Diego M Bezerra, Felix JJA Bianchi, Virginie Boreux, Vincent Bretagnolle, Berta Caballero-Lopez, Pablo Cavigliasso, Aleksandar Cetkovic, Natacha P Chacoff, Alice Classen, Sarah Cusser, Felipe D da, Silva e Silva, G Arjen de Groot, Jan H Dudenhoffer, Johan Ekroos, Thijs Fijen, Pierre Franck, Breno M Freitas, Michael PD Garratt, Claudio Gratton, Juanhipolito Hipolito, Andrea Holzschuh, Lauren Hunt, Aaron L Iverson, Shalene Jha, Tamar Keasar, Tania N Kim, Miriam Kishinevsky, Bjorn K Klatt, Alexandra Klein, Kristin M Krewenka, Smitha Krishnan, Ashley E Larsen, Claire Lavigne, Heide Leire, Bea Maas, Maike Nesper, Rachel E Mallinger, Eliana Martinez, Alejandra Martinez-Salinas, Tim D Meehan, Matthew GE Mitchell, Gonzalo AR Molina, Lovisa Nilsson, Megan O'Rourke, Marcell K Peters, Milan Plecas, SImon G Potts, Davi de L Ramos, Jay A Rosenheim, Maj Rundlof, Adrien Rusch, Agustin Saez, Jeroen Scheper, Matthias Schleuning, Julia Schmack, Amber R Sciligo, Colleen Seymour, Dara A Stanley, Rebecca Stewart, Jane C Stout, Louis Sutter, Mayura B Takada, Hisatomo Taki, Giovanni Tamburini, Matthias Tschumi, Blandina F Viana, Catrin Westphal, Bryony K Wilcox, Steve D Wratten, Akira Yoshioka, Carlos Zaragoza, Wei Zhang, Yi Zou, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter

    Science Advances   5 ( 10 )   eaax0121   2019.10

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE  

    Human land use threatens global biodiversity and compromises multiple ecosystem functions critical to food production. Whether crop yield-related ecosystem services can be maintained by a few dominant species or rely on high richness remains unclear. Using a global database from 89 studies (with 1475 locations), we partition the relative importance of species richness, abundance, and dominance for pollination; biological pest control; and final yields in the context of ongoing land-use change. Pollinator and enemy richness directly supported ecosystem services in addition to and independent of abundance and dominance. Up to 50% of the negative effects of landscape simplification on ecosystem services was due to richness losses of service-providing organisms, with negative consequences for crop yields. Maintaining the biodiversity of ecosystem service providers is therefore vital to sustain the flow of key agroecosystem benefits to society.

    DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aax0121

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  • Temporal and spatial variation in the risk of grazing damage to sown grasslands by sika deer (Cervus nippon) in a mountainous area, central Japan Reviewed

    Ayaka Hata, Hideharu Tsukada, Akane Washida, Takayuki Mitsunaga, Mayura B Takada, Tetsuo Suyama, Masahiko Takeuchi

    Crop Protection   119   185 - 190   2019.5

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    DOI: 10.1016/j.cropro.2019.02.002

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  • Dead or alive? Sexual conflict and lethal copulatory interactions in long-jawed Tetragnatha spiders Reviewed

    Yuki G Baba, Akio Tanikawa, Mayura B. Takada, Kyoko Futami

    Behavioral Ecology   29   1278 - 1285   2018.10

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    DOI: 10.1093/beheco/ary125

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  • Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition Reviewed

    Karp Daniel S, Chaplin-Kramer Rebecca, Meehan Timothy D, Martin Emily A, DeClerck Fabrice, Grab Heather, Gratton Claudio, Hunt Lauren, Larsen Ashley E, Martinez-Salinas Alejandra, O'Rourke Megan E, Rusch Adrien, Poveda Katja, Jonsson Mattias, Rosenheim Jay A, Schellhorn Nancy A, Tscharntke Teja, Wratten Stephen D, Zhang Wei, Iverson Aaron L, Adler Lynn S, Albrecht Matthias, Alignier Audrey, Angelella Gina M, Anjum Muhammad Zubair, Avelino Jacques, Batary Peter, Baveco Johannes M, Bianchi Felix J. J. A, Birkhofer Klaus, Bohnenblust Eric W, Bommarco Riccardo, Brewer Michael J, Caballero-Lopez Berta, Carriere Yves, Carvalheiro Luisa G, Cayuela Luis, Centrella Mary, Cetkovic Aleksandar, Henri Dominic Charles, Chabert Ariane, Costamagna Alejandro C, De la Mora Aldo, de Kraker Joop, Desneux Nicolas, Diehl Eva, Diekoetter Tim, Dormann Carsten F, Eckberg James O, Entling Martin H, Fiedler Daniela, Franck Pierre, van Veen F. J. Frank, Frank Thomas, Gagic Vesna, Garratt Michael P. D, Getachew Awraris, Gonthier David J, Goodell Peter B, Graziosi Ignazio, Groves Russell L, Gurr Geoff M, Hajian-Forooshani Zachary, Heimpel George E, Herrmann John D, Huseth Anders S, Inclan Diego J, Ingrao Adam J, Iv Phirun, Jacot Katja, Johnson Gregg A, Jones Laura, Kaiser Marina, Kaser Joe M, Keasar Tamar, Kim Tania N, Kishinevsky Miriam, Landis Douglas A, Lavandero Blas, Lavigne Claire, Le Ralec Anne, Lemessa Debissa, Letourneau Deborah K, Liere Heidi, Lu Yanhui, Lubin Yael, Luttermoser Tim, Maas Bea, Mace Kevi, Madeira Filipe, Mader Viktoria, Cortesero Anne Marie, Marini Lorenzo, Martinez Eliana, Martinson Holly M, Menozzi Philippe, Mitchell Matthew G. E, Miyashita Tadashi, Molina Gonzalo A. R, Molina-Montenegro Marco A, O'Neal Matthew E, Opatovsky Itai, Ortiz-Martinez Sebaastian, Nash Michael, Ostman Orjan, Ouin Annie, Pak Damie, Paredes Daniel, Parsa Soroush, Parry Hazel, Perez-Alvarez Ricardo, Perovic David J, Peterson Julie A, Petit Sandrine, Philpott Stacy M, Plantegenest Manuel, Plecas Milan, Pluess Therese, Pons Xavier, Potts Simon G, Pywell Richard F, Ragsdale David W, R, Tatyana A, Raymond Lucie, Ricci Benoit, Sargent Chris, Sarthou Jean-Pierre, Saulais Julia, Schackermann Jessica, Schmidt Nick P, Schneider Gudrun, Schuepp Christof, Sivakoff Frances S, Smith Henrik G, Whitney Kaitlin Stack, Stutz Sonja, Szendrei Zsofia, Takada Mayura B, Taki Hisatomo, Tamburini Giovanni, Thomson Linda J, Tricault Yann, Tsafack Noelline, Tschumi Matthias, Valantin-Morison Muriel, Mai Van Trinh, van der Werf Wopke, Vierling Kerri T, Werling Ben P, Wickens Jennifer B, Wickens Victoria J, Woodcock Ben A, Wyckhuys Kris, Xiao Haijun, Yasuda Mika, Yoshioka Akira, Zou Yi

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA   115 ( 33 )   E7863 - E7870   2018.8

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:NATL ACAD SCIENCES  

    The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win-win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are measured. Here, we use a pest-control database encompassing 132 studies and 6,759 sites worldwide to model natural enemy and pest abundances, predation rates, and crop damage as a function of landscape composition. Our results showed that although landscape composition explained significant variation within studies, pest and enemy abundances, predation rates, crop damage, and yields each exhibited different responses across studies, sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing in landscapes with more noncrop habitat but overall showing no consistent trend. Thus, models that used landscape-composition variables to predict pest-control dynamics demonstrated little potential to explain variation across studies, though prediction did improve when comparing studies with similar crop and landscape features. Overall, our work shows that surrounding noncrop habitat does not consistently improve pest management, meaning habitat conservation may bolster production in some systems and depress yields in others. Future efforts to develop tools that inform farmers when habitat conservation truly represents a win-win would benefit from increased understanding of how landscape effects are modulated by local farm management and the biology of pests and their enemies.

    DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1800042115

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  • Detecting crucial dispersal pathways using a virtual ecology approach: A case study of the mirid bug Stenotus rubrovittatus Reviewed

    Takeshi Osawa, Kazuhisa Yamasaki, Ken Tabuchi, Akira Yoshioka, Mayura B. Takada

    Ambio   47 ( 7 )   1 - 10   2018.2

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Springer Netherlands  

    Detecting dispersal pathways is important both for understanding species range expansion and for managing nuisance species. However, direct detection is difficult. Here, we propose detecting these crucial pathways using a virtual ecology approach, simulating species dynamics using models, and virtual observations. As a case study, we developed a dispersal model based on cellular automata for the pest insect Stenotus rubrovittatus and simulated its expansion. We tested models for species expansion based on four landscape parameters as candidate pathways
    these are river density, road density, area of paddy fields, and area of abandoned farmland, and validated their accuracy. We found that both road density and abandoned area models had prediction accuracy. The simulation requires simple data only to have predictive power, allowing for fast modeling and swift establishment of management plans.

    DOI: 10.1007/s13280-018-1026-y

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  • Climate-mediated population dynamics enhance distribution range expansion in a rice pest insect Reviewed

    Takeshi Osawa, Kazuhisa Yamasaki, Ken Tabuchi, Akira Yoshioka, Yasushi Ishigooka, Shigeto Sudo, Mayura B. Takada

    Basic and Applied Ecology   30   41 - 51   2018

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Elsevier GmbH  

    Environmental fluctuations can influence invertebrate population dynamics over large spatial scales, and effects of climate change are of particular importance in understanding phenology. In this study, we tested whether changing climate patterns could increase voltinism and emergence synchrony in Stenotus rubrovittatus and drive the mirid bug's expansion into currently uninhabited areas of Japan. This expansion could have potentially serious economic consequences for the rice industry. We modelled development of S. rubrovittatus in the field applying the effective accumulated temperature model to calculate the theoretical number of generations and the egg hatching dates from 2003 to 2012 based on a high-resolution, daily weather database. We then performed a regional analysis to assess the relationship between population dynamics and range expansion across the study region and also included a local analysis to evaluate how population parameters affect the presence of S. rubrovittatus at local sites in each year. Results showed that distribution expanded with a relative increase in voltinism and with synchrony of egg hatching date. Moreover, we showed that increased voltinism in the previous year positively influenced local population occurrence. This positive effect suggests that the species’ distribution range expands through increased reproduction at both the regional and local scale. Climate-mediated population dynamics play a significant role in range expansion of the mirid bug.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.baae.2018.05.006

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  • Stable isotope and DNA analyses reveal the spatial distribution of crop-foraging brown bears Reviewed

    A. Hata, M. B. Takada, R. Nakashita, K. Fukasawa, T. Oshida, Y. Ishibashi, Y. Sato

    JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY   303 ( 3 )   207 - 217   2017.11

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    We investigated maize (Zea mays) consumption by brown bears (Ursus arctos) in a subpopulation of eastern Hokkaido, Japan, using carbon stable isotope analysis of hair samples to better understand the pattern and scale of movement of the bears' crop-foraging behavior. We identified a total of 30 individuals (19 males and 11 females) using DNA analysis of the hair samples. Stable isotope analysis suggested that female bears that were more likely to consume maize lived closer to agricultural crop fields. Our statistical model also estimated that the relative maize consumption of female bears decreased rapidly as the distance to crop fields increased to 3-4 km, similar to the radius of the annual home range of female bears. In contrast, male bears that were more likely to consume maize lived both in forested areas and near crop fields. Even if male bears live in a forested area except during the maize harvest period, they appeared to be at risk of being killed by lethal control because they can move from forested areas to crop fields during the maize harvest period. Collecting hair samples of many bears in the population over several years may allow the effect of lethal control on population viability to be estimated non-invasively.

    DOI: 10.1111/jzo.12479

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  • Factors affecting frequency of riparian forest use by sika deer and red foxes in an agricultural landscape in Tokachi, Hokkaido, and their seasonal variations Reviewed

    22 ( 1 )   63 - 73   2017

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.18960/hozen.22.1_63

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  • Association between Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in Raccoons and Environmental Factors of their Habitats in Tokachi District, Hokkaido, Japan Reviewed

    YAMAGUCHI Emi, TAKADA Mayura B., FUJII Kei, KOBAYASHI Kohei, IMAI Kunitoshi, KADOHIRA Mutsuyo

    Journal of Veterinary Epidemiology   19 ( 2 )   108 - 113   2015

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:The Japan Society of Veterinary Epidemiology  

    Raccoons (Procyon lotor), intermediate hosts of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), utilize a variety of environments, so they are thought to be good indicators of the presence of T. gondii oocysts in their habitat. In this study, a serological survey of T. gondii was conducted in raccoons captured between 2010 and 2014 in rural areas of the Tokachi district, Hokkaido, Japan to estimate environmental factors associated with T. gondii prevalence. Antibodies were detected from 9.4% (10/107) with latex agglutination tests. Logistic mixed regression models showed that total river length (km) in raccoon habitats was associated positively with T. gondii seropositivity (OR=14.67, 95% CI=2.64—81.58). Cats (Felis silvestris catus) are natural hosts of T. gondii, and together with raccoons they share riverside environments. In such areas where humans do not remove trash and animal feces, raccoons might easily be exposed to matured oocysts. Environmental factors associated with T. gondii prevalence in raccoons could be important information to identify high risk areas for human T. gondii infection. Our present result was also useful from the public health perspectives when considering the infection risk of T. gondii to humans.

    DOI: 10.2743/jve.19.108

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    Other Link: https://jlc.jst.go.jp/DN/JLC/20020994813?from=CiNii

  • Spider ecology in agroecosystem : from field-plot scale to nation-wide scale Reviewed

    66 ( 2 )   101 - 111   2015

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (other academic)  

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  • Dispersal-mediated effect of microhabitat availability and density dependence determine population dynamics of a forest floor web spider Reviewed

    Mayura B. Takada, Tadashi Miyashita

    JOURNAL OF ANIMAL ECOLOGY   83 ( 5 )   1047 - 1056   2014.9

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:WILEY-BLACKWELL  

    1. Landscapes in nature can be viewed as a continuum of small total habitable area with high fragmentation to widely spreading habitats. The dispersal-mediated rescue effect predominates in the former landscapes, while classical density-dependent processes generally prevail in widely spread habitats. A similar principle should be applied to populations of organisms utilizing microhabitats in limited supply.
    2. To test this hypothesis, we examined the population dynamics of a web spider, Neriene brongersmai, in 16 populations with varying degrees of microhabitat availability, and we explored whether: (i) high microhabitat availability improves survival rate during density-independent movement, while the resultant high density reduces survival rate in a densitydependent manner; and (ii) temporal population stability increases with microhabitat availability at the population level. Furthermore, we conducted two types of field experiments to verify whether high microhabitat availability actually reduces mortality associated with website movement.
    3. Field observations revealed that demographic change in N. brongersmai populations was affected by three factors at different stages, namely the microhabitat limitation from the early to late juvenile stages, the density dependence from the late juvenile to adult stages and the food limitation from the adult to the next early juvenile stages. In addition, there was a tendency for a positive association between population stability and microhabitat availability at the population level.
    4. A small-scale experiment, where the frequency of spider web relocation was equalized artificially, revealed that high microhabitat availability elevated the survival rate during a movement event between web-sites. The larger spatiotemporal scale experiment also revealed an improved spider survival rate following treatment with high microhabitat availability, even though spider density was kept at a relatively low level.
    5. The population dynamics of N. brongersmai can be determined primarily by density-independent processes based on web-site fragmentation and density-dependent processes driven by interference competition. We conclude that depending on the amount of habitat resources, the relative importance of the two contrasting paradigms-equilibrium and non-equilibrium-appears to vary, even within a particular system.

    DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12213

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  • Landscape effects of a non-native grass facilitate source populations of a native generalist bug, Stenotus rubrovittatus, in a heterogeneous agricultural landscape Reviewed

    A. Yoshioka, M. B. Takada, I. Washitani

    JOURNAL OF INSECT SCIENCE   14   110   2014.8

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC  

    Non-native plant species can provide native generalist insects, including pests, with novel food and habitats. It is hypothesized that local and landscape-level abundances of non-native plants can affect the population size of generalist insects, although generalists are assumed to be less sensitive to habitat connectivity than specialists. In a heterogeneous landscape in Japan, the relationship between the density of a native pest of rice (Stenotus rubrovittatus (Matsumura) (Heteroptera: Miridae)) and the abundance of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam. (Poales: Poaceae)), a non-native meadow grass known to facilitate S. rubrovittatus, was analyzed. Statistical analyses of data on bug density, vegetation, and the spatial distribution of fallow fields and meadows dominated by Italian ryegrass, obtained by field surveys, demonstrated that local and landscape-level abundances of Italian ryegrass (the unmowed meadow areas within a few hundred meters of a sampling plot) positively affected bug density before its immigration into rice fields. Our findings suggest that a generalist herbivorous insect that prefers non-native plants responds to spatial availability and connectivity of plant species patches at the metapopulation level. Fragmentation by selective mowing that decreases the total area of source populations and increases the isolation among them would be an effective and environmentally-friendly pest management method.

    DOI: 10.1673/031.014.111

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  • Comparison of generalist predators in winter-flooded and conventionally managed rice paddies and identification of their limiting factors Reviewed

    Mayura B. Takada, Shun Takagi, Shigeki Iwabuchi, Takuya Mineta, Izumi Washitani

    SPRINGERPLUS   3   2014.8

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    Winter-flooding of rice paddies without the application of agricultural chemicals is attracting attention as a new agricultural method for enhancing the habitat conditions of wintering waterfowl in rice paddy ecosystems throughout Japan and east Asia. Conditions in these paddies are expected to result in restoration of not only the winter habitats of waterfowl but also those of other taxonomic groups during the rice growing season. In this study, we tested whether the diversity of summer spiders-ubiquitous predators in rice paddies-was higher in the winter-flooded paddies than in the conventional ones by conducting field measurements in 31 winter-flooded and 7 conventional paddies. Limiting factors of spiders in the winter-flooded paddies were then examined. Results revealed that both the density and species richness of spiders were significantly higher in the winter-flooded paddies than in the conventional ones both before and after the insecticide application against pecky rice bug Stenotus rubrovittatus (Matsumura) (Hemiptera: Miridae) to conventional paddies. In addition, spider density and species richness in the winter-flooded paddies correlated with the availability of two prey groups-chironomids and other nematocera. These findings suggest that in the winter-flooded paddies the diversity of generalist predators is higher than in the conventional ones during the rice-growing season and that the combination of management at both the landscape and field level is likely more effective for increasing spider abundance in winter-flooded paddies.

    DOI: 10.1186/2193-1801-3-418

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  • Selection of rub trees by brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Hokkaido, Japan Reviewed

    Yoshikazu Sato, Chisato Kamiishi, Tomoaki Tokaji, Masayuki Mori, Sanae Koizumi, Kyoko Kobayashi, Tetsuji Itoh, Waka Sonohara, Mayura B. Takada, Tsuyoshi Urata

    ACTA THERIOLOGICA   59 ( 1 )   129 - 137   2014.1

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    Tree rubbing by brown bears (Ursus arctos) is a well-known behavior throughout the animal's distribution. There is still insufficient information on the characteristics and function of the behavior. We investigated seasonal frequency of tree rubbing by brown bears, characteristics and reasons for selection of rub trees, and characteristics of bear signs on and around rub trees in a mixed coniferous-broad-leaved deciduous forest in Hokkaido, Japan. Between 1998 and 2009, we found 172 rub trees and confirmed 995 tree rubbings. We found that the rub trees were used repeatedly by bears within a year and for multiple years (more than 10 years). Tree rubbing by brown bears was observed from April to November, with a peak between May and June that corresponds to the mating season of brown bears. Abies sachalinensis was selected and broad-leaved trees were avoided for tree rubbing based on estimated availability in natural forest. The preference for Abies sachalinensis might be because the strong odor of resin attracts bears for rubbing their head and neck in resinous substances and for increasing the detectability of their markings by receptor bears. Selected trees for rubbing were located right beside the trail on relatively level ground among trees along roads or trails. Trees had a relatively large diameter at breast height. These characteristics would also serve to increase the access and detectability of their markings. Series of pad-shaped depressions was the most frequently observed (70 %) indication of bear rubbing, followed by debarking (51 %) and clawing (30 %). In terms of visual and olfactory signal amplification, physical damage by bears to the trees might have a function to enhance the smell as a result of increase in outflow of the resin. We conclude that tree rubbing behavior is associated with the mating season of brown bears and that the main purpose of this behavior is scent marking to communicate intraspecifically during the mating season.

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  • Factors influencing road-kill frequency of red fox Vulpes vulpes with attention to the effects of landscape structure and harvest of sika deer Cervus nippon yesoensis for nuisance control and hunting in eastern Hokkaido, Japan Reviewed

    Nishio Tsubasa, B. Takada Mayura, Uno Hiroyuki, Sato Yoshikazu, Yanagawa Hisashi

    53 ( 2 )   301 - 310   2013.12

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    DOI: 10.11238/mammalianscience.53.301

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  • Sika deer browsing differentially affects web-building spider densities in high and low productivity forest understories Reviewed

    Moeko Minoshima, Mayura B. Takada, Naoki Agetsuma, Tsutom Hiura

    Ecoscience   20 ( 1 )   55 - 64   2013.3

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    The effects of sika deer (Cervus nippon) browsing and understory productivity on web-building spiders' density were experimentally examined. We particularly focused on the nonlinear effects of these 2 factors and their underlying mechanisms. Our field experiments controlling deer density and understory productivity revealed that the deer affected the densities of 2 abundant spider species nonlinearly: the deer effect was unimodal or constant in lower productivity plots and negative in higher productivity plots. The nonlinear effects seemed to occur because the response trend of the spiders' limiting factors to deer impact differed between lower and higher productivity plots. In lower productivity plots, the density of the most abundant spider species, Prolinyphia longipedella, was limited by dicot cover, and both spider density and dicot cover had unimodal-shaped responses to deer density. This spider species was limited by the availability of twigs in higher productivity plots and responded negatively to deer density. Deer seemed to affect web-building spider density in understory vegetation by changing the number of available sites for webs through browsing. However, the precise limiting factors differed with understory productivity. Since forest understory productivity is expected to show large variation at various spatial scales due to differences in canopy tree density, the availability of nutrients, and other environmental factors, considering nonlinear effects is important when predicting the impact of large herbivores on invertebrates in forest understories.

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  • Facilitation of ground-dwelling wolf spider predation on mind bugs by horizontal webs built by Tetragnatha spiders in organic paddy fields Reviewed

    Mayura B. Takada, Tetsuya Kobayashi, Akira Yoshioka, Shun Takagi, Izumi Washitani

    JOURNAL OF ARACHNOLOGY   41 ( 1 )   31 - 35   2013

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    Trait-mediated effects of predators can impact prey population dynamics by affecting prey behavior,. The mind bug Stenotus rubrovittatus (Matsumura) (Hemiptera: Miridae), a major insect pest in Japanese rice production, usually remains in the upper layer of paddies to feed on rice ears. However, the minds are frequently trapped by horizontal webs of Tetragnatha spp. spiders, which are highly abundant in organic rice paddies, and fall to the bottom layers of paddies where they are preyed upon by ground-dwelling predators. It is hypothesized that Tetragnatha spp. spiders facilitate bug predation by wolf spiders through trait-mediated effects, in which their horizontal Webs force the bugs onto or near the ground and thereby into the hunting zones of wolf spiders. Molecular gut-content analysis of 619 wolf spiders coupled with field measurements revealed that the number of wolf spiders that tested positive for mind bug predation increased significantly with the density of Tetragnatha spp. spiders in the paddies. We also observed a positive relationship between Tetragnatha spp. abundance and total cover by their webs in paddies. We identified the potential for an unexpected interaction between an herbivorous insect pest and ground-dwelling spiders that usually inhabit different microhabitats in paddy fields by focusing on trait-mediated effects of webs built by Tetragnatha spp. Because spider webs occupy a certain proportion of the available space in terrestrial ecosystems, consideration of trait-mediated effects on interactions between flying insects and other predators may lead to a better understanding of local food webs.

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  • Multiple spatial scale factors affecting mirid bug abundance and damage level in organic rice paddies Reviewed

    Mayura B. Takada, Akira Yoshioka, Shun Takagi, Shigeki Iwabuchi, Izumi Washitani

    BIOLOGICAL CONTROL   60 ( 2 )   169 - 174   2012.2

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    Mirid bugs, major insect pests in rice production, have dramatically expanded their range in Japan, resulting in increased economic losses especially for organic rice farmers. In this study, the within-field and landscape-scale factors affecting the bug and its damage to crops were examined in organic rice farms. Bug densities and crop damage levels showed significant positive relationships with weed densities (Schoenoplectus juncoides and Echinochloa crus-galli) within individual fields. Bug densities were negatively associated with Tetragnatha spp. and Pachygnatha clercki densities, indicating that these spiders act as biological control agents that help to decrease crop damage levels. At the landscape scale, bug densities increased with the proportion of the area that was fallow within a 400-m radius around focal fields. Fallows represent important source habitat for the bug and the spatial extent at which bug abundance was affected indicates the mobility of these insects. These results suggest that the combination of biological control by natural enemies, and weed management within individual paddies and surrounding landscapes inside a buffer zone of less than half a kilometre may be effective in controlling mirid bugs and the damage they cause in organic paddy fields. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2011.11.011

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  • Facilitation of a Native Pest of Rice, Stenotus rubrovittatus (Hemiptera: Miridae), by the Non-Native Lolium multiflorum (Cyperales: Poaceae) in an Agricultural Landscape Reviewed

    Akira Yoshioka, Mayura Takada, Izumi Washitani

    ENVIRONMENTAL ENTOMOLOGY   40 ( 5 )   1027 - 1035   2011.10

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    Source populations of polyphagous pests often occur on host plants other than the economically damaged crop. We evaluated the contribution of patches of a non-native meadow grass, Lolium multiflorum Lam. (Poaceae), and other weeds growing in fallow fields or meadows as source hosts of an important native pest of rice, Stenotus rubrovittatus (Matsumura) (Hemiptera: Miridae), in an agricultural landscape of northern Japan. Periodical censuses of this mind bug by using the sweeping method, vegetation surveys, and statistical analysis revealed that L. multiflorum was the only plant species that was positively correlated with the density of adult S. rubrovittatus through two generations and thus may be the most stable and important host of the mind bug early in the season before the colonization of rice paddies. The risk and cost of such an indirect negative effect on a crop plant through facilitation of a native pest by a non-native plant in the agricultural landscape should not be overlooked.

    DOI: 10.1603/EN11032

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  • Spider predation on a mirid pest in Japanese rice fields Reviewed

    Tetsuya Kobayashi, Mayura Takada, Shun Takagi, Akira Yoshioka, Izumi Washitani

    BASIC AND APPLIED ECOLOGY   12 ( 6 )   532 - 539   2011

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    Spiders are common generalist predators, and understanding their potential in biological control is important for the development of integrated pest management programs. In this study, predation by three groups of spiders on the mind bug Stenotus rubrovittatus (Hemiptera: Miridae) in rice paddies was investigated using DNA-based gut-content analysis. A laboratory feeding study revealed that the detection half-lives of bug DNA in the spider gut at 25 degrees C was 3.4 days for Lycosidae and 1.5 days for Tetragnathidae. Individual spider predation on the mind bug was investigated by detecting DNA of prey in field-collected spiders. In total, 1199 spiders were assayed from three spider groups: Pirata subpiraticus (Lycosidae), Tetragnatha spp. (Tetra-gnathidae), and Pachygnatha clercki (Tetra-gnathidae), which each differ in their preferred microhabitat as well as their predatory habits. Detection rates of prey DNA in spiders increased significantly with the density of prey across all spider groups. P subpiraticus and Tetragnatha spp. predation showed a better fit to a saturated response curve to increasing prey density, while P. clercki showed a simple linear relationship with prey density. Densities of alternative prey species did not affect the detection rates of minds. These results suggest that predation on pests by generalist predators in an agroecosystem is affected not only by prey abundance but also by predator preference for specific prey. Predator preference is therefore an important factor to consider when estimating the role of natural enemies as biological control agents.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.baae.2011.07.007

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  • Analysis of factors affecting rice-crop damage by sika deer in a landscape context and construction of a risk map in the Boso Peninsula, central Japan Reviewed

    TAKADA Mayura, SUZUKI Maki, OCHIAI Keiji, ASADA Masahiko, MIYASHITA Tadashi

    Japanese journal of conservation ecology   15 ( 2 )   203 - 210   2010

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    The sika deer population (Cervus nippon) in the Boso Peninsula of Chiba, central Japan, has expanded dramatically in recent decades, causing serious damage to rice crops. To predict the level of damage, we conducted approximately 350 interviews of paddy field owners and developed a regression model that included local deer density and landscape structure surrounding paddy fields as explanatory variables. Model selection using Akaike's information criterion (AIC) revealed that the level of damage was affected by landscape structure within a 400-m radius of a focal rice field as well as local deer density. This spatial scale was consistent with the home-range size of sika deer as well as the scale determining food quality and the reproductive rate of deer in the Boso Peninsula. The level of damage also increased with an increase in forested area but tended to decrease with increases in the surrounding forest-edge length in areas with higher deer densities. We also constructed a risk map for rice-crop damage to determine local deer densities that could keep damage at low levels using the above regression model. The estimated deer density at which this occurred was highly variable depending on landscape structure. Comparing such risk maps and current local deer density will help to facilitate the establishment of an objective management plan in a heterogeneous landscape.

    DOI: 10.18960/hozen.15.2_203

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  • 農地生態系への植物の侵入・導入がもたらす 「見かけの競争」 型害虫被害と広域的発生源管理の可能性 Invited Reviewed

    吉岡明良, 高田まゆら, 鷲谷いづみ

    関東雑草研究会   21 ( 21 )   26 - 34   2010

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  • Contrasting responses of web-building spiders to deer browsing among habitats and feeding guilds. Reviewed International journal

    Mayura Takada, Yuki G Baba, Yosuke Yanagi, Saeko Terada, Tadashi Miyashita

    Environmental entomology   37 ( 4 )   938 - 46   2008.8

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    We examined web-building spider species richness and abundance in forests across a deer density gradient to determine the effects of sika deer browsing on spiders among habitats and feeding guilds. Deer decreased the abundance of web-building spiders in understory vegetation but increased their abundance in the litter layer. Deer seemed to affect web-building spiders in the understory vegetation by reducing the number of sites for webs because vegetation complexity was positively correlated with spider density and negatively correlated with deer density. In contrast, the presence of vegetation just above the litter layer decreased the spider density, and deer exerted a negative effect on this vegetation, possibly resulting in an indirect positive effect on spider density. The vegetation just above the litter layer may be unsuitable as a scaffold for building webs if it is too flexible to serve as a reliable web support, and may even hinder spiders from building webs on litter. Alternatively, the negative effect of this vegetation on spiders in the litter may be as a result of reduced local prey availability under the leaves because of the reduced accessibility of aerial insects. The response to deer browsing on web-building spiders that inhabit the understory vegetation varied with feeding guild. Deer tended to affect web-invading spiders, which inhabit the webs of other spiders and steal prey, more heavily than other web-building spiders, probably because of the accumulated effects of habitat fragmentation through the trophic levels. Thus, the treatment of a particular higher-order taxon as a homogeneous group could result in misleading conclusions about the effects of mammalian herbivores.

    DOI: 10.1603/0046-225X(2008)37[938:CROWST]2.0.CO;2

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  • ニホンジカによる森林土壌の物理環境の改変: 房総半島における広域調査と野外実験 Reviewed

    柳洋介, 高田まゆら, 宮下直

    保全生態学研究   13   65 - 74   2008.5

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    DOI: 10.18960/hozen.13.1_65

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  • Habitat provisioning for aboveground predators decreases detritivores Reviewed International journal

    Tadashi Miyashita, Mayura Takada

    ECOLOGY   88 ( 11 )   2803 - 2809   2007.11

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    Although provisioning of habitat by ecosystem engineers is one of the most common biological interactions, previous studies have mostly focused on facilitative or bottom-up processes. Here we show that engineering effects can indirectly strengthen top-down effects mediated by predator abundance. We conducted a small-scale manipulative. field experiment and broad-scale. field observations of the plant, web spider, and detrital insect system in forest understory habitats. In the field experiment, artificially increasing architectural elements enhanced the abundance of spiders by providing physical support for web building. Moreover, aerial insects derived from the detrital food web decreased in response to increased spider abundance. As artificial architecture per se did not affect aerial detritivores, these results indicate that ecosystem engineering indirectly strengthens top-down effects mediated by predators. In field observations conducted in 12 cedar forests, path analyses supported the importance of an indirect pathway originating from understory vegetation complexity to spider abundance and to aerial detritivores. The effect size of spiders on detrital insects was similar in the field experiment and in the observations. These results indicate that the engineering effects of plants cascade to detrital insects through web spiders across different scales.

    DOI: 10.1890/06-1633.1

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  • Landscape structure affects food quality of sika deer (Cervus nippon) evidenced by fecal nitrogen levels Reviewed

    Tadashi Miyashita, Maki Suzuki, Mayura Takada, Go Fujita, Keiji Ochiai, Masahiko Asada

    POPULATION ECOLOGY   49 ( 3 )   185 - 190   2007.7

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    Evaluating the quality of wildlife habitat is essential for understanding and predicting population dynamics in heterogeneous environments. We used fecal nitrogen levels as an indicator of habitat quality of sika deer (Cervus nippon) and explored important landscape elements influencing nitrogen levels, taking deer density into account. We established 92 plots differing in deer density and landscape structure on the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, and collected fecal samples along a 1-km transect at each plot. The regression models involving two independent variables, i.e., deer density and the length of forest edge within an area of 100 or 200 m from the transect, were selected based on the Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC). Levels of fecal nitrogen were positively correlated with the length of the forest edge and negatively correlated with population density of deer. The area of 100 or 200 m from the transect most likely reflected the behavioral scale of the deer. Coverage of palatable understory vegetation increased with proximity to forest edge and decreased with deer density. Variability in the level of fecal nitrogen could thus be explained by food availability in the landscape. These results suggest that landscape alterations increase the carrying capacity of sika deer and thereby increase impacts upon the ecosystem.

    DOI: 10.1007/s10144-007-0046-4

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  • Additive and non-additive effects from a larger spatial scale determine small-scale densities in a web spider Neriene brongersmai Invited Reviewed

    M Takada, T Miyashita

    POPULATION ECOLOGY   46 ( 2 )   129 - 135   2004.8

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    We examined 15 populations of Neriene brongersmai, a common sheet-web spider inhabiting cedar forest floor, to find out how density at a small spatial scale (patch level) is determined by processes operating at this scale as well as those from a larger spatial scale (population level). Here we focus on two types of large-scale effects that may influence small-scale density: an additive effect that changes the density at patch level; and a non-additive effect that changes the relationship between the density and its limiting factor at the patch level. ANCOVA showed that patch-level density of this spider was positively correlated with web-site availability at this level, but the density with a given amount of web-site differed among populations (cedar forests), indicating the existence of an additive large-scale effect. Multiple regression analysis showed that web-site availability at a population level explained the additive large-scale effect well, but prey availability and forest size did not. It seemed likely that increased web-site availability may have reduced the mortality of spiders while moving to a new web-site, and hence increased population density. A non-additive large-scale effect was also revealed: i.e. the relationship between density and web-site availability at the patch level tended to be stronger in populations with a greater additive large-scale effect. Higher intraspecific competition for web-sites in these populations appeared to have strengthened this relationship.

    DOI: 10.1007/s10144-004-0187-7

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  • Indirect effects of herbivory by deer reduce abundance and species richness of web spiders Reviewed International journal

    T Miyashita, M Takada, A Shimazaki

    ECOSCIENCE   11 ( 1 )   74 - 79   2004

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    We examined the abundance and species richness of web spiders in forests with and without deer to test the hypothesis that herbivory by deer simplifies habitat structure, thereby reducing the number of web spiders. The number of individuals, the number of species, and the availability of potential web sites were all lower where deer were present. The decrease in the abundance of spiders in the presence of deer was more prominent in large species. The species richness standardized by rarefaction was still lower where deer were present in one of two seasons, suggesting that the reduced number of species in the presence of deer was not simply a by-product of the decreased number of individuals. Web site availability was positively correlated with the number of individuals as well as with the number of species when both forest types were combined. However, prey availability, estimated by the number of insects captured with sticky traps, did not differ significantly between sites with and without deer. Thus, the decrease in spiders was most likely caused by indirect non-trophic effects of herbivory that were mediated by the simplification of habitat structure, not by a decrease in prey abundance.

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  • Can spines deter deer browsing?: A field experiment using a shrub Damnacanthus indicus Reviewed International journal

    Mayura Takada, Masahiko Asada, Tadashi Miyashita

    Journal of Forest Research   8 ( 4 )   321 - 323   2003.11

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    We examined the defensive function of spines of Damnacanthus indicus against deer herbivory by experimentally removing spines in the field where deer density is high. Individuals of D. indicus whose spines had been removed had a higher probability of being browsed by deer than control individuals. In addition, plant height was significantly lower for individuals that were browsed than those that were not. These results support the notion that spines of D. indicus have a function to deter deer browsing. This study is the first to demonstrate experimentally the defensive function of spines against large mammals in temperate areas.

    DOI: 10.1007/s10310-003-0043-1

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  • Experimental evidence that aboveground predators are sustained by underground detritivores Reviewed International journal

    T Miyashita, M Takada, A Shimazaki

    OIKOS   103 ( 1 )   31 - 36   2003.10

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    Detrital infusion into grazing food web is considered to be important in terrestrial communities, but there is hardly any experimental evidence showing that generalist predators aboveground are sustained by belowground detritivores. We established two types of experimental plots in the forest floor, one with sheets on the ground to prevent the emergence of belowground arthropods and the other without sheet, to test the hypotheses that 1) reduced input of detrital arthropods decreases the abundance and species richness of web spiders (major generalist predators in terrestrial ecosystems) and 2) lower number of spiders increases the abundance of herbivorous arthropods. We found that spiders were less abundant in plots where the emergence of detrital arthropods was reduced, while the abundance of herbivores did not significantly increase in these plots. These results provide empirical evidence that organisms moving from underground to aboveground may be important for the maintenance of aboveground predators, although the cascading effect of predator abundance on the grazing food chain was not detected in the present study.

    DOI: 10.1034/j.1600-0706.2003.12586.x

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  • Cross-habitat foraging by sika deer influences plant community structure in a forest-grassland landscape Reviewed International journal

    M Takada, M Asada, T Miyashita

    OECOLOGIA   133 ( 3 )   389 - 394   2002.11

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    We demonstrated the effect of cross-habitat foraging by sika deer (Cervus nippon) on plant communities under the hypothesis that the intensity of herbivory on a plant community is changed by the presence of a preferable habitat for deer nearby. To investigate this landscape-level effect, we examined two types of forest understory; "adjacent site" was located near agricultural fields where deer prefer to forage, and "remote site" was far from fields. We compared plant community structures between adjacent and remote sites in areas with high deer densities, and found that plant species richness and plant coverage were significantly higher in adjacent sites than in remote sites. We hypothesized that this difference was caused by the lower intensity of browsing at adjacent sites due to the higher use of fields by the deer at these sites. The following four results supported this hypothesis. First, in areas with no deer, plant species richness and plant coverage did not differ significantly between adjacent and remote sites. Second, we demonstrated a lower intensity of herbivory at adjacent sites by experimentally transplanting a preferred plant species, Aucuba japonica. Third, we detected no difference in the number of deer fecal pellets found in adjacent and remote sites, indicating that the difference in browsing intensity between the two sites was not due to differences in the frequency of site use by the deer. Fourth, fecal analysis showed that deer at adjacent sites consumed more graminoids, suggesting that deer at these sites used fields to forage because graminoids were abundant in fields. All of these results support the notion that the intensity of herbivory on forest understorys becomes lower in the presence of agricultural fields nearby. This also implies the importance of the indirect effects at the landscape level in that the two ecosystems are linked by the consumers moving between them.

    DOI: 10.1007/s00442-002-1037-y

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  • Regional differences in the morphology of a shrub Damnacanthus indicus: An induced resistance to deer herbivory? Reviewed

    M Takada, M Asada, T Miyashita

    ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH   16 ( 4 )   809 - 813   2001.12

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    We report here the possibility of an induced resistance of a spiny shrub Damnacanthus indicus against deer herbivory. Six characters of D. indicus were compared between regions with and without deer herbivory on the Boso Peninsula. We found that D. indicus in browsed areas produced smaller leaves, thicker spines, and shorter internode distances between spines than those in unbrowsed areas whereas the length of spines and the angle of a pair of spines did not differ significantly. It is likely that D. indicus shows an induced resistance by producing smaller leaves, and by increasing stoutness of spines and spine density.

    DOI: 10.1046/j.1440-1703.2001.00436.x

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Books

  • 保全生態学の技法(鷲谷いづみ, 宮下 直, 西廣 淳, 角谷 拓 編)

    高田まゆら( Role: Contributor第10章 水田害虫に対する捕食性天敵の機能評価法)

    東京大学出版会  2010.3  ( ISBN:9784130622196

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    Total pages:324   Responsible for pages:217-237   Language:Japanese   Book type:Scholarly book

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  • ハネナシヒメバチ属の一種によるウヅキコモリグモの卵のうへの寄生

    馬場友希, 村田遼大, 松本吏樹郎, 高田まゆら

    KISHIDAIA   118   12 - 13   2021.2

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    Authorship:Corresponding author   Language:Japanese  

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  • 農作物採食は野生ニホンジカの早熟化を促進する

    秦彩夏, 小坂井千夏, 佐伯緑, 中島泰弘, 鵜野光, 中下留美子, 姉崎智子, 南正人, 福江佑子, 樋口尚子, 高田まゆら

    農研機構中央農業研究センター成果情報(Web)   2020   2020

  • 景観構造に着目したシカ食害の仕組み解明 Invited

    高田 まゆら

    農業技術体系 最新農業技術 作物   7   2014

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (trade magazine, newspaper, online media)  

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  • ヒグマ個体群の空間構造―アトラクティブ・シンク現象の解明と被害管理への応用―

    佐藤喜和, 高田まゆら, 園原和夏, 伊藤哲治, 小林喬子, 伊吾田宏正

    哺乳類科学   54   161 - 163   2014

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  • 企画集会 「始めよう! ベイズ推定によるデータ解析」 に参加して: 始めようとしている者からの参加レポート (参加レポート,< 特集 2> 始めよう! ベイズ推定によるデータ解析) Invited

    高田 まゆら

    日本生態学会誌   59   217 - 218   2009.7

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    Language:Japanese  

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Presentations

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Research Projects

  • 品種間差異を利用したハスの花の発熱・恒温性機能の解明

    2020.7 - 2023.3

    文部科学省  科学研究費基金  挑戦的研究(萌芽) 

    樋口 洋平, 郭 威

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    Grant type:Competitive

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  • 農地景観の変化と気候変動が水田害虫の分布拡大に与える影響:長期データによる検証

    2016.4 - 2022.3

    文部科学省  科学研究費補助金  基盤研究(B) 

    馬場まゆら, 高田まゆら

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    Grant type:Competitive

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  • 分布周縁部のアトラクティブ・シンク化がヒグマ個体群および人間社会に及ぼす影響

    2017.4 - 2021.3

    文部科学省  科学研究費補助金 基盤研究(B) 

    佐藤 喜和

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    Grant type:Competitive

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  • 農地景観の変化と気候変動が水田害虫の分布拡大に与える影響:長期データによる検証

    2016.4 - 2021.3

    文部科学省  科学研究費補助金 基盤研究(B) 

    馬場まゆら, 高田まゆら

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    Authorship:Principal investigator  Grant type:Competitive

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  • ヒグマ個体群のアトラクティブ・シンク現象解明とモニタリングおよび被害管理への応用

    2011.4 - 2015.3

    文部科学省  科学研究費補助金 基盤研究(B) 

    佐藤 喜和

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    Grant type:Competitive

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  • 環境保全型水田におけるクモの網の非栄養的効果がイネ害虫の被害防除に果たす役割

    2011.4 - 2014.3

    文部科学省  科学研究費補助金 若手研究(B) 

    馬場まゆら, 高田まゆら

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    Authorship:Principal investigator  Grant type:Competitive

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  • 森林性鳥類が局所及び景観スケールでの人為的環境改変から受ける影響

    2010.4 - 2013.3

    文部科学省  科学研究費補助金 基盤研究(C) 

    栁川 久

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  • クモの網がもたらす非栄養的効果が3栄養段階からなるメタ群集構造に与える影響

    2009.4 - 2010.3

    特別研究員奨励費 

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    Grant type:Competitive

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  • DNAマーカーを用いた胃内容分析による環境保全型水田における土着天敵の役割の評価

    2008.4 - 2010.3

    文部科学省  科学研究費補助金 若手研究(スタートアップ) 

    高田 まゆら

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  • 景観構造を考慮した動物群集の多様性維持機構解明に関する研究

    2009 -  

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    Grant type:Competitive

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  • ランドスケープレベルでの水田食物網を考慮した害虫防除のための農業技術の確立

    2007.10 - 2008.9

    日本生命財団  ニッセイ財団若手研究助成 

    高田 まゆら

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  • シカの採食がもたらす環境改変の連鎖とそれが生態系に及ぼす影響

    2003.4 - 2005.3

    特別研究員奨励費 

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    Grant type:Competitive

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  • 土着天敵を利用したイネ害虫防除のための空間生態学的研究

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    Grant type:Competitive

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Committee Memberships

  • 2021.4 - Now

    日本蜘蛛学会   Acta Arachnologica 編集委員  

  • 2020.10 - Now

    日本学術会議   連携会員  

  • 2020.4 - Now

    日本生態学会   キャリア支援委員  

  • 2019.6 - Now

    日本生態学会   Ecological Research Editor  

  • 2011.4 - Now

    日本生態学会   保全生態学研究編集委員  

  • 2016.4 - 2017.12

    埼玉県   環境影響評価技術審議会委員  

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Academic Activities

  • 小集会「斑点米カメムシ類の分布拡大機構の解明:個体群生態学から景観、マクロ生態学へ」

    Role(s): Planning, management, etc.

    日本応用動物昆虫学会  2019.3 -  

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  • 日本蜘蛛学会第48回大会 実行委員会委員

    Role(s): Planning, management, etc.

    日本蜘蛛学会  2016.8    

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  • 日本哺乳類学会 2009年度大会台北大会実行委員会委員

    Role(s): Planning, management, etc.

    日本哺乳類学会  2009.11    

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